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Wanna-Be Chef: Cheap Cheese Bean Casserole

Not every geek hits it rich with just the right algorithm and moves to Miami when he (or she!) retires at 35. I am not among that group, or any group near it. Cutting budgets can mean crappy food while you work. Cheap and quick recipes can be useful. At the very least, some way to mix up the usual stuff with a minor twist can at least make the daily drudge a bit more acceptable, for the moment.

This is my recipe for what I call Cheap Cheese Bean Casserole.

Ingredients:
  • 1 Cup Baked Beans (I prefer Bush's Maple Cured)
  • 1 Slice Chedder Cheese
  • 2 Beef Hotdogs (Cheese Dogs work well here)
  • 1/2 Cup Slightly Crushed Saltine Crackers
The instructions are dirt simple but the result is delicious, filling, and perfect on a cold day. Cut up the hotdogs and add to the beans. Cover with the chedder cheese and evenly cover the entire bowl with the crackers. Microwave on medium for 2:30. The cheese will melt into the beans, the crackers will be protected from the sauses and remain crisp. The result is great for five minutes and probably a collective $2 dollar price tag.

Later this week I'll post about the results and recipe for my attempt at flame grilled, beef stuffed bell peppers. Also, I'll talk about why on earth I'm writing about cooking and posting recipes on a tech blog, so stay tuned for that!

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