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Promoting Feeds by Including Treats

I've been reading an eBook in my attempts at being a better blogger and reaching a wider audience, and although I recommend it to read by anyone with similar goals, its more how I got it than what I got that I wanted to bring up. Some might know that I recently looked into ways of capitolizing on my feeds. Nearly 70% of my traffic (maybe more) is via feed subscribers, who never see my advertising. That is quite a bit of lost revenue, not that it would add up to much if they all went straight to my front page. None the less, its a problem I want a solution to. Now, I really like feeds. I don't want to make you come to my website if you prefer feeds, because I know I don't even read websites these days unless they have a feed. Even if I find a particular article I like, I typically just subscribe to the feed and wait for the article to get to me through it. Still, others are not so open to the new medium, and often treat feeds marketing. Maybe they are. These people will give you just a few lines of preview, requiring you to following the link back to the original post. Maybe they'll strip media and links from the feeds, so you need to follow back to their site to read more on the topic. There are a host of ways of turning feeds into website traffic.



That is why I found it wonderfully refreshing to see Chris Garrett actually going out of his way to entice users to subscribe to his feed in order to receive extra content that was unavailable through his website. Will this lead to a larger subscriber base? Probably. Will some portion of those readers follow back to his site from time to time? Probably. Will enticing users into a medium that is traditionally a drain on revenue and a problem for content creators who even love it actually benefit this man for his efforts? I think so.



Now, what do I have to give?



Killer Flagship Content - Free Ebook To Download @ chrisg.com



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Comments

williams said…
This was an inspiring post,Thanks for the sharing of such information deferred revenue software .

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