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How To Stop Me From Buying An iPod Touch

So I've been looking at the new line of iPods and thinking about how much I wanted an iPhone without the phone, so the iPod Touch seemed to be exactly what I wanted. Thankfully, Morgan Webb pointed me to this story about why I might be reconsidering. Now, I run both Windows and Linux. My wife is the one in the household who refuses to run Windows at all, how about that? On both operating systems I already have players that can use the old iPod lines. I use WinAmp and Amarok, although I am anxious for Amarok on Windows to be stable enough to move to. Sorry, Nullsoft! Where am I left now? I guess I need to look at my options, and I'm not really excited over the UI itself on the Touch, but the hardware. Do Nokia Internet Tablets include an MP3 player with decent battery time? I could import a miniOne from China. Thank you eastern friends!

How quickly can Apple break their high horse's legs?

Comments

Jesse said…
It's already been fixed/worked around, if you're talking about the new checksum'ing

http://hardware.slashdot.org/hardware/07/09/17/135205.shtml
Marius Gedminas said…
The Nokia Internet Tablets have a built-in mp3 player. There are also installable alternatives with nicer user interfaces. I don't know how long the battery would last if you were listening to an mp3 with the screen turned off. Several hours definitely, but I can't tell how many.

The most glaring deficiency from an open-source friendly person's perspective is lack of built-in Ogg Vorbis support.

I'm happy with my N800, but I'm not blind to its deficiencies. If you want a pocketable Linux laptop replacement with an ssh client (installable separately), a web browser (built-in) and a reasonable-pixel-size screen (800x480), by all means go for it, but if you just want a small mp3 player, a device dedicated for that would do better.
Alec Munro said…
I'm entirely in agreement. Apple didn't waste any time in destroying my interest in the Touch. Of course, it will be worked around, but it's not a game I feel like playing any more.

I'm leaning towards the Cowon Q5, but it's late, expensive, and Windows CE based, so it's far from a sure thing.

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