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Devil’s Dictionary of Programming

 another great post from Devil’s Dictionary of Programming at Programming is Terrible
simple — It solves my use case.opinionated — I don’t believe that your use case exists.elegant — The only use case is making me feel smart.lightweight — I don’t understand the use-cases the alternatives solve.configurable — It’s your job to make it usable.minimal — You’re going to have to write more code than I did to make it useful.util — A collection of wrappers around the standard library, battle worn, and copy-pasted from last weeks project into next weeks.dsl — A domain specific language, where code is written in one language and errors are given in another.framework — A product with the business logic removed, but all of the assumptions left in.documented —There are podcasts, screencasts and answers on stack overflow.startup — A business without a business plan.hackday — A competition where the entry fee is sleep deprivation and the prize is vendor lock in.entrepreneur — One who sets out to provide a return on investment.serial entrepreneur — One who has yet to provide a return on investment.disrupt — To overcome any legal, social, or moral barrier to profit.

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