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Thoughts: Flexbox is going to make rich editing of layout wonderful

I took a dive into Flexbox layouts recently, and I'm blown away by how powerful, understandable, and flexible they are. This new at off layout options is so fabulous to use, it feels like you aren't even writing CSS (which historically deals with layouts so terribly that I couldn't even conceive of it being pleasant).

In a minor tangent, I've got to wonder what affect this child have in our tooling. We don't have a great track record for CSS authoring tools, especially in terms of layout versus style. Could this change with the introduction of a clean, simple layout model our tools could actually present properly?

I can definitely imagine a rich content editor utilizing the kind of controls already common over table layouts being applied to the flexible axes of this new scheme.

We might, if we entertain the thought, finally be able to empower or non-condensing stingers to produce compliant CSS for the layouts they actually want in a system they can actually understand without loops, tricks, or pain!

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