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How To Own A T-Mobile G1 for One Week

So I've had my G1 for about a week now and I'm happier with it every day. There are still some issues I have, but none that are related to the most important piece: the Android operating system. I love the software available and new things come at a decent pace. There are some network issues, but limited to my particular side of the apartment complex. I don't know anywhere else in town that I don't have good coverage.

Interestingly, to me, my favorite application is Bubble, a basic bubble level app that works vertically or horizontally or to test the level of a surface. I don't have a lot of use for it, but it highlights some of the things I like most about open, portable devices. I imagine a real reduction not just in the number of devices I need (I'll be selling my iPod soon) but just the number of things, period.

Now, I have felt like there is a lack of games for the system. More, that the games there are have been pretty much feeling like prototypes pushed to the Market because it feels cool. I'm really hoping this will change, but I think the mobile gaming market is going to need a good cross-platform solution before we see really nice things. I'm sure the iPhone people will tell me how they have better games, but I can't imagine really good entertainment available until we get a common platform for Android, the iPhone, Windows Mobile and Blackberry devices, and their brethren. Get on it, Adobe. If you loose mobile, you loose your foothold.

I've started to get really interested in mobile development. Some serious thought went into hacking in the Android SDK to get Jython on the device, but I feel confident it will be done and I simply don't have the cycles for it. It has given me a new mindset in my web work, however, and I'm giving some real consideration to the problems there are doing just about anything on the mobile web. Yeah, this Android Browser can handle just about any page I've tossed at it, and I'm really happy about that. We can't deny, however, that it just doesn't work to implement the same on something completely different. I don't like dragging text and I hate horizontal panning with a passion.

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