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Who types correctlly?

Even the most computer-literate geeks usually do not use the "proper" methods of typing. I've not used it since keyboarding class in Jr High, myself. I am wondering, do you use the proper methods or not? Do you rest on the home row and hit the space with a thumb and never an index? I'm also wondering, has anyone taken the plunge and tried to relearn their typing skills after years of doing it the "wrong" way?

Comments

Anonymous said…
I do keep my fingers on the home row and space with my thumb, so I don't have to relearn that. But I rest my wrists rather than cupping my hands over the keyboard.

Several years ago I learned to type with a Dvorak key layout. It was very difficult and took many months before I was fluent. In retrospect I think it was worth it though, I type faster and it is much easier on my hands.
Anonymous said…
I'm pretty close.

I don't type exactly the way I learned in middle school - I'm coding, writing email & IM after all, not typing letters.

But yeah, I type right.
Anonymous said…
In my experience, most computer literate people do type correctly but they rest their wrists.

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