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How To Perfect the Keyboard and Mouse

This is my dream so don't squash it for sounding trivial. This is my window to the world, the tools of my job, and the outlet of my creativity! I want the Perfect Keyboard and the Perfect Mouse.

  • Operate as NiMH battery chargers when plugged into USB for power
  • Lighted keyboard to type in darker conditions. Must be adjustable
  • Must be configurable to PC and Mac layouts
  • Would be handy to configure to DVORAK layout, as well
  • Retractable USB cables
  • Keyboard functions as USB hub, even wirelessly
  • Scroll ball instead of a scroll wheel. I do love my Mighty Mouse
  • Weights for mouse, with storage in keyboard
  • Trackball (or even a nub) in the keyboard to lean back and browse with
  • Splittable keyboard with locking adjustments
I am going to spend the rest of my life replacing perfectly good keyboard and mouse combos if no one solves this simple list of requirements.

The adjustable keyboard is probably the hardest part, combined with the other requirements I want fit into it. I'd like to pull the keyboard apart at a split, adjust the angle, and lock it into positions. The numpad would be handy to detach or just adjust, but it doesn't bother me as much.

I use a cheap Micro Innovations set right now, and they serve me well. I use the new slim apple keyboard and a Mighty Mouse at work. Everyone else at the office hates the Mighty Mouse, except one girl upstairs who I do not know. I have taken my place as maintainer of these holy relics, so that I will always have them to love upon.

Looking at the current market of adjustable keyboards gives my wallet a sharp pain in the money fold. Not that I need permission from the little lady to make such a purchase, but she's said there is no problem. I think she just wants me to bitch a little less about hand cramps and joint pain. No trouble in the wrists that would point to something serious, so don't worry. I Always use a wrist pad and meticuously adjust my keyboard, pad, and chair to keep the arms at the best position. I'm a stickler for ergonomics, and its the arms and hands that get the bulk of that attention.

Stay comfortable, people.

EDIT September 9, 2009 I moved onto a Logitech EX110 set a couple months ago and the feet already cracked in half and broke off, simultaneously. I am getting by with a flat keyboard for the moment and have made the decision to get a Kenesis Freestyle, but I haven't decided on the details yet. Has anyone tried these? Can anyone recommend good setups with them? Alternatively, can anyone suggest other makers of two-part keyboards, maybe even with wireless models?

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