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NaNoWriMo 2014: Day 4

I ended today with only 6671 words. Staying on par would have been 6667 so I was only four words over, and worse I only wrote 1600 words today. That's technically under goal for the day, but I'm on pace for the month. I made the mistake of not getting even a little writing time in during the morning, before work, so I had everything to do sitting down at night. If I aim to get back on track I need to get in 30 minutes tomorrow morning and the mornings after that, giving myself a head start for the day.

Jory MacKay's How I Forgot to Write was a particularly personally hitting piece to read as my daily writing motivation. If we aren't careful we can let the skills we have wane and that is certainly something I think happened to me at some point in the last five years, and regaining those skills is a big part of what I'm doing NaNoWriMo.

The six-step program outlined is full of gems. Among the two that I hold most closely to my own writing: Find a routine and Learn to love editing. From these two the most important lines I'm carrying away today will help motivate me.
what matters is that you set a schedule and stick to it.
 and
Writing is editing.
 But, really, you should read the whole piece.

See all my posts about NaNoWriMo 2014

Comments

Anonymous said…
Hi there, good to see that your writing improves, but could you please send *just* the Python posts to the Planet Python RSS feed? Thank you!

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