Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Dead To Me! DomNomNom

DomNomNom was a toy templating tool for front-end web applications I built during a long ride in the passenger seat. The idea was to build a templating system that required minimal, and in many cases, no template at all. I wanted to see if it was possible to map data directly into markup structures based purely on semantics.


For example, instead of some mark up that rendered a title into the page like {{ title }} we might just map the <h1> tag to the title in the data binding.


$(“body”).domnomnom({
“h1”: “This is the title”,
})


And it was really easy to get this basic setup in place quickly. I began to take it further. I allowed mapping lists of data, which would clone an element instead of simply inserting the text contents into it. Suddenly I could render tables and lists with ease.


“ul”: {
“li”: [“one”, “two”, “three”]
}


And the markup’s original <li> would function as a template to clone for this content. It was very clean to write templates for, because they were just mark-up with dummy data and content in them. This meant a designer could build the templates with whatever tools they wanted and the data could just get pumped into it.


DomNomNom in its final state supports mapping syntax that can handle attributes and properties, so you can map into form fields and the like. There are also controls capable of changing the order cloned elements are inserted and allowing the clone templates to be controlled better. If I removed the empty lines for formatting, the whole thing would come in under 100 lines of Javascript.


I built this on jQuery, but if I re-did this based on modern browsers with querySelector it probably wouldn’t grow by more than a dozen lines, and would be a lot faster.

Check it out, if just to see.

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I write here about programming, how to program better, things I think are neat and are related to programming. I might write other things at my personal website.

I am happily employed by the excellent Caktus Group, located in beautiful and friendly Carrboro, NC, where I work with Python, Django, and Javascript.

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