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A Drop of Thought

My adsense experiment didn't pan out. I shouldn't be surprised. I forgot about the Adsense for Feeds Beta. If that exists, then obviously the normal adsense doesn't work for feeds. I'll leave them in, anyway, just to see what happens with the channels on the front page.

Took a look at web.py to see if it could be useful for our needs, but I really can't tell entirely. I don't think so, however. The documentation is just way too sparse.


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