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Friday Night Link Up

  1. PyPlus

    Creates a python-style C++. This replaces {} with indentation and removes excess parenthesis. Its definately a very interesting project, but how many uses it sees I am not sure of.

  2. Tiger Woods Wii: Doesn't look poopy :: DESTRUCTOID :: Hardcore gaming blog

    One of my favorite games on the Wii has been the golf of WiiSports, but it is very limited and toyish, as fun as it is. The Tiger Woods title looks absolutely fantastic and I've never been a fan of golf or golf video games, but I'll pick this title up on launch day.
  3. WiiCade.com - Flash Games on your Nintendo Wii

    I had hoped someone would do this. Bookmark the website on your Wii and get quick access to lots of web-based flash and java games that are friendly to being played via the Wii and Wiimote.
  4. Nothing But Videos: Man Shoots Electricity Out Of His Hands

    There really isn't much more that I can say about this after the title. He even sets fire to things with his fingertips, and does this on a regular basis!
  5. Offline Gmail and Blogger Using the Dojo Offline Toolkit

    This is a great idea that needs explored more thoroughly. Web apps become more and more widespread and even with the proliferation of always-on connections, we can't forget that things need to work when the network fails, I'm working off solar panels in the mountains, or the world has ended and only patches of ad-hoc networks survive.

    The idea is to enable web applications that can cache lots of data for offline use. I used to abuse Google Reader to do this before the long drives to and from North Carolina, by scrolling across all my hundreds of unread items they would all be downloaded internally and then even offline I would be able to read through them. This kind of functionality needs to be empowered, not accidental.
  6. Firefox 3 Plans and IE8 Speculation - Browsers Heading Apart Again

    I am more interested in how far Firefox 4 will go to providing a unique platform for web applications. Will we open up the embedded SQLite database to javascript in the pages, or bind OpenGL for accelerated rendering into canvas elements?
  7. Levy Interviews Steve Jobs About iPhone - Newsweek Steven Levy - MSNBC.com

    I was going to write about how Steve Jobs is a moron because of the whole "no third party software" thing on the iPhone, but then I realized that I'm sure I would absolutely love the iPhone. Does it point to a larger problem that one of the most important technological minds of our era can only solve the problem by just locking everyone out?

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