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Bad eMusic Expiriences?

Has anyone has had a bad expirience with eMusic? Lured by promises of DRM-free MP3 files, like so many others, I signed up for a trial of their service. I was unimpressed with the selection, although I understand the problem they face trying to convince the labels that their methods are financially safe for the music industry. Still, my wife and I were unable to find even a handful of songs we were interested in, and I found it impossible to actually download anything. Their download manager gave me an error about some non-existant cache directory within my Firefox installation, and their support offered no help that actually solved the problem, just a standard "Reinstall the program and try it again." Realizing the service would not be worth the $9.99 per month, I cancelled my account and didn't look back.

Until they charged my bank account two weeks later and caused me a series of cascading overdraft fees that I've had to lodge a complaint with my bank to clear up. I contacted eMusic about this issue, and they will not respond, so my bank is looking into this matter for me. Thank god for fraudulent charge protection on my Visa, because the month of eMusic I didn't even want almost cost me $73.99 plus a massive headache.

Comments

Anonymous said…
Just had a similar experience. eMusic suks! Horrible site - bad browsing and web site layout. They are missing LOTS of popular, common tunes. Their movie soundtrack selection is horrible. I can't say enough bad things about eMusic - don't ever sign up for it - its really bad.

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